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The Future of Challenging Traditional Moulds of Architecture
December 9, 2021 at 6:30 PM
by Mamathaa Hemanth
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The future of architecture in the coming years is not easy to predict with the fast-paced changes and not-so-predictable times. From which trends will sweep the housing sectors, to what kind of design work environment will the co-operates want?

We often hear the phrase "originality is dead" which is not wrong but with constant development in technology and budding minds in the industry, it is pretty clear there will be some new and important changes taking place soon. Though it can't be accurately predicted what exactly these changes will be, Archslate has dived deep into the subject to bring you;

5 Changes that'll Happen to the Traditional Moulds of Architecture

1. Environmentally Conscious Architecture

2. Why Rather than Whom

3. Preferring Renovation over Demolition

4. Assess Quality Rather than Quantity

5. Rehabilitation of Public Spaces

1. Environmentally Conscious Architecture

Climate change is one of the crucial deciding factors of the architectural industry which needs to evolve with the crisis. New European guidelines mandate that all homes built in Europe after 2020 consume almost zero energy. Gonzalo Pardo, a Spain-based Gon Architects, and associate professor of architectural projects at the Technical University of Madrid stated in an interview with Houzz.com "Although architecture got on the green bandwagon late, measures seeking to make it a sustainable part of society are now being put into place. We think about an architectural project from a thermodynamic point of view more often, seeking to reduce energy consumption."

All of this will be done in order to reduce the carbon footprint of our buildings and might also help to reduce the cost of production in some aspects going back to the old ways of doing things.

2. Why Rather than Whom

For almost a decade, one of the ongoing biggest debates amongst architects interested in the potential of digital tools and technologies is around whether digital and parametric design tools are merely a means to an end, eg. the ‘how’ something gets designed. In today's world, it is apparent that the whom factor is an inextricably true and unchangeable factor for developing discussions around the uses of artificial intelligence, data privacy, social media, and the future of automation in the media.

But in the late 2000s, there was slightly more naiveté amongst the vast majority of architects who were, by then, using digital tools in their practice. And the function of the house with respect to the environment, the society, and the durability became more interesting to them, a little more than the need of the residents or the client.

3. Preferring Renovation over Demolition